The Classics Club: Classics Spin #4

classics club  It’s time for another round of The Classics Spin at The Classics Club!  The rules of the game are as follows:

  1. Pick twenty books that you’ve got left to read from your Classics Club List.
  2. Try to challenge yourself: list five you are dreading/hesitant to read, five you can’t WAIT to read, five you are neutral about, and five free choice (favorite author, rereads, ancients — whatever you choose.)
  3. Post that list, numbered 1-20, on your blog by next MondayNovember 18.
  4. Monday morning, we’ll announce a number from 1-20. Go to the list of twenty books you posted, and select the book that corresponds to the number we announce.
  5. The challenge is to read that book by January 1, even if it’s an icky one you dread reading! (No fair not listing any scary ones!)

 
 
Last time around, I didn’t get finished with my book in time, so this time I’m determined to finish!  But the last 6 weeks of the year are always hectic, and I already have a full shelf of books lined up for various discussion groups and challenges.  So I’ve decided to set myself up for success by populating my Classics Spin list with the shorter works from my Classics Club 5-year list.  I’ve adhered to the rules of the game and still included 5 books I’m hesitant to read, yet none of the potential titles is so lengthy that I’m in danger of getting bogged down and not finishing in time.  
 
Here’s my list, randomized via the List Randomizer at Random.org,  followed by a break-down of categories.  Wish me luck, and let me know if you’re in for this round of the CC Spin, too!

     

  1. Wilder, Thornton – The Bridge of San Luis Rey (1927)
  2. Brautigan, Richard – In Watermelon Sugar (1968)
  3. Bulgakov, Mikhail – Heart of a Dog/A Dog’s Heart (1925)
  4. Gilman, Charlotte Perkins – The Yellow Wallpaper (1892)
  5. Akutagawa, Ryūnosuke – Rashomon and Other Stories (collection, 1915)
  6. Abbott, Edwin A. – Flatland (1884)
  7. Steinbeck, John – Of Mice and Men (1937)
  8. Dinesen, Isak (aka Karen Blixen) – Babette’s Feast (1952)
  9. Zweig, Stefan – The Royal Game/Chess Story (1941)
  10. McCullers, Carson – The Ballad of the Sad Cafe (1951)
  11. Voltaire – Candide (1759)
  12. Dostoyevsky, Fyodor – The Double (1846)
  13. Comyns, Barbara – Who Was Changed and Who Was Dead (1954)
  14. Calvino, Italo – The Castle of Crossed Destinies (1969)
  15. Mishima, Yukio – The Sound of Waves (1954)
  16. Duras, Marguerite – The Lover (1984)
  17. Panshin, Alexei – Rite of Passage (1968)
  18. Lispector, Clarice – The Hour of the Star (1977)
  19. Fitzgerald, F. Scott – The Great Gatsby (1925, reread)
  20. Fouqué, Friedrich de la Motte – Undine (1811)

 
 
Five I am dreading/hesitant to read:

Duras, Marguerite – The Lover (1984)
—– (I am not usually a fan of romances or chronicles of love lives.)
Fitzgerald, F. Scott – The Great Gatsby (1925, reread)
—– (When I read this as a teen, I developed the unpopular opinion of disliking it. I’ll give it another shot.)
Gilman, Charlotte Perkins – The Yellow Wallpaper and Other Stories (1892)
—– (I am sorely afraid this will anger and depress me.)
Steinbeck, John – Of Mice and Men (1937)
—– (I know this will depress me, but it’s high time I read it.)
Voltaire – Candide (1759)
—– (I have put this off for years, and I’m worried I’ll find it dull and frustrating. I want to love it!)
 
Five I am neutral about:
Akutagawa, Ryūnosuke – Rashomon and Other Stories (1915)
Dinesen, Isak (aka Karen Blixen) – Babette’s Feast (1952)
Lispector, Clarice – The Hour of the Star (1977)
McCullers, Carson – The Ballad of the Sad Cafe (1951)
Mishima, Yukio – The Sound of Waves (1954)
 
Five I can’t wait to read:
Brautigan, Richard – In Watermelon Sugar (1968)
Comyns, Barbara – Who Was Changed and Who Was Dead (1954)
Dostoyevsky, Fyodor – The Double (1846)
Wilder, Thornton – The Bridge of San Luis Rey (1927)
Zweig, Stefan – The Royal Game/Chess Story (1941)
 
Five free choices: science fiction/fantasy:
Abbott, Edwin A. – Flatland (1884)
Bulgakov, Mikhail – Heart of a Dog/A Dog’s Heart (1925)
Calvino, Italo – The Castle of Crossed Destinies (1969)
Fouqué, Friedrich de la Motte – Undine (1811)
Panshin, Alexei – Rite of Passage (1968)

 

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12 thoughts on “The Classics Club: Classics Spin #4

  1. I love the way you organized this post! I may have to use this setup next time. 😉

    I love The Great Gatsby! Lol. But I am a Fiztgerald fan in general. I also really liked In Watermelon Sugar. 🙂

    Of Mice and Men, I never want to read that! I am such a brat about reading sad things. I know I should, but some I can’t force myself to read.

    I will cross my fingers that you get to read a book that you are excited to read!

    Reply
  2. I read The Yellow Wallpaper yesterday, and it was a weird, yet thought-provoking book. It’s so short, that it seems like it’s over in a second, and to be honest, not much happens. But it definitely stays with you! I’ll be posting my review on it shortly.

    I studied Gatsby last year, and I severely, severely disliked it. I was in the same, emptier boat as you. The rest of my class couldn’t understand my hatred for it, I might join you in a re-read of it though, if it gets picked. Just to see if my attitudes have changed post-studying it.

    Candide is one that I’ve similarly been putting off. I’d be interested to see your views on it if it gets picked!

    Good luck on your spin! I hope you get one you want!

    Reply
    • Ah, that letter from Steinbeck to his son is a long-time favorite piece of mine. It’s wonderful! And I did absolutely love Cannery Row, so I have warm feelings towards the author. I know I will be blown away by OMaM…I’m just steeling myself for the sad bits. 🙂

      Reply
  3. This is a wonderful list! I love the varying collection. I haven’t read most of them, but there are a few *likes* on the list. Also, I hope you enjoy The Great Gatsby whenever you end up rereading it. I’m a big Fitzgerald fan.

    Reply
  4. Ooooh, I have to say that your list sounds to be nearly all depressing books? Well, I supposed that will balance with all the cheery Christmas-y season :p

    Good luck!! We’ll compare notes afterwards 🙂

    Reply

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